Face the Nation transcripts March 31, 2013: Religion and politics on Easter Sunday

(CBS News) Below is a transcript of "Face the Nation" on March 31, 2013, hosted by CBS News' Bob Schieffer. Guests include Archbishop Timothy Dolan, Bishop Mariann Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, Imam Suhaib Webb of the Islamic Society of Boston, Bishop Harry Jackson of the International Communion of Evangelical Churches, and Rabbi David Wolpe of Sinai Temple in Beverly Hills. Then, we'll turn to history and politics with Amity Shlaes, author of the acclaimed biography of Calvin Coolidge; Jeffrey Frank, who chronicled the odd relationship between Eisenhower and Nixon in "Ike and Dick; World War II historian Lynn Olson of "Those Angry Days" on Roosevelt's battle with Charles Lindbergh, and Paul Reed who wrote "The Last Lion," about Winston Churchill during World War II.

SCHIEFFER: Today on Face the Nation, we'll tack religion and politics on this holy week for Christians and Jews. What is the state of religion in America?

CARDINAL TIM DOLAN, ARCHBISHOP OF NEW YORK: More and more people are saying, you know what, I don't have trouble with god, I don't have trouble with Jesus, I don't have trouble with faith, I do have some troubles with the church. That's a major pastoral challenge, not only for us as Catholics, but for the other revealed religions.

SCHIEFFER: In addition to Archbishop Timothy Dolan just back from Rome where he took part in the selection of the new pope, we'll hear from Bishop Mariann Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, Imam Suhaib Webb of the Islamic Society of Boston, Bishop Harry Jackson of the International Communion of Evangelical Churches, and Rabbi David Wolpe of Sinai Temple in Beverly Hills. Then on page two, we'll turn to political leadership with the authors of four widely acclaimed books, Amity Shlaes, author of the acclaimed biography of our 30th president Calvin Coolidge; Jeffrey Frank, who chronicled the odd relationship between Eisenhower and Nixon in "Ike and Dick; World War II historian Lynn Olson of "Those Angry Days" on Roosevelt's battle with Charles Lindbergh, and Paul Reed who wrote "The Last Lion," the compelling story of Winston Churchill during World War II. From the secular to the spiritual, because this is Face the Nation.

ANNOUNCER: From CBS news in Washington, Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer.

SCHIEFFER: And we our broadcast this morning with the Catholic Archbishop of New York Timothy Dolan. Your Eminence, we welcome you. We want to talk about the significance of this week to not just Christianity, but to other religions as well. We also want to talk about the state of religion in America. But we haven't talked to you since the selection of the new Pope Francis, and I just want to catch up a little and ask can you a little about that. What was that like?

DOLAN: Bob, that is one of the most exciting events in my whole life. And I think it's going to take me a long time to work through it and to process it.

It was a combination of nervousness, intimidation, awe, a real genuine experience of the grace of the holy spirit, and at the end, a sense of resolution, peace, and excitement. It's tough to explain what went on there, and of course I can't talk about some of it, but I tell you, I left filled with a great sense of promise, hope, jubilation. And so far what we've seen in our new holy father wound vindicate those sentiments.

SCHIEFFER: From the reporting of the Wall Street Journal and some others, I take it that the speech that the soon-to-be pope made to a group of you at a dinner may have been the thing that got people most interested and excited about him when he talked about, according to the reporting, that the church simply had to stop looking inward and start look outward, and devote itself to helping the poor.

DOLAN: Yeah, he did. He reminded us, Bob, of what it means to be Catholic. Catholic is a synonym for everybody, all-embracing, worldwide, everybody's welcome. And he said maybe we spend a little too much time getting hung up on the all the internal problems we've got -- and you bet we've got them, and you can bet he's going to try to tend to some of them. But he said we always have to look behind. Because first of all we have got to look to god, and his son, Jesus Christ. And then we have got to look to our people, especially those who are most in need and who look to the church for a sense of hope, a sense of renewal, and for some help, especially those who are poor and sick and struggling.

SCHIEFFER: What do you think it means to Catholics in America that we now have a pope who is from the New World and not from Europe?

DOLAN: I think it means a lot. And I think especially for us, Bob, it means two things. Number one, that he comes from what the Europeans still refer to as the New World, from Latin America. And it reminds us of how the church is growing, how the church is universal, how in some ways, the church started in Jerusalem and went to Rome, that's part of our glorious and revered history. But now the church has expand, North and South America, Asia, Africa -- that's where the real boom is, that's where the real life is. And secondly, a booster shot for us, especially in North America, where we're blessed with a wonderfully vibrant Hispanic and Latino population. Boy, it was a real shot in the arm. These people are moved to tears. You talk about a sense of excitement. I can't go anywhere in New York City where I've got people from Mexico, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Puerto Rico, who are coming up in tears saying we have a Latin American pope. It's a real shot in the arm for us as Catholics.

SCHIEFFER: Let's talk about the state of religion in America today. I just saw a statistic that said one-fifth of the U.S. public, one-third of adults under 30 are now religiously unaffiliated. And this is the highest percentage ever, according to this Pew survey, since 2007. It has gone up from 15 percent of the people who have no affiliation to now about 20 percent. How would you judge the state of America's spirituality these days?

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