DSK accuser suing NY Post for "hooker" claim

Former International Monetary Fund leader Dominique Strauss-Kahn leaves his temporary residence in the TriBeCa neighborhood of New York July 2, 2011. AP Photo

NEW YORK - The hotel maid at the center of the now-teetering sex assault case against Dominique Strauss-Kahn filed a libel lawsuit Tuesday against the New York Post the tabloid reported she was a prostitute.

The woman's lawyer, Kenneth Thompson, filed the claim in Bronx state Supreme Court after the Post, relying on anonymous sources, referred to the 32-year-old as a "prostitute" and a "hooker." The paper also reported that she "traded sex for money" and turned tricks at a Brooklyn hotel while she was being housed by the Manhattan District Attorney's office.

All of those statements are false, according to the lawsuit, and have subjected the woman to humiliation and ridicule.

"We filed the suit because rape victims should not be called prostitutes," Thompson said.

A spokeswoman for the Post said the paper stands by its reporting.

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The Post's claims came in a series of articles published after a special hearing Friday in which Strauss-Kahn, the 62-year-old former head of the International Monetary Fund, was released without bail after prosecutors conceded that new information about the woman's life had forced them to reconsider the case.

The Post has not named the woman, as is customary policy in the U.S. media with people who say they are victims of sexual assault.

But her attorney said it is clear to whom they are referring, because there is only one hotel maid accusing Strauss-Kahn of attempted rape.

In articles over the weekend in print and online, the Post reported that the 32-year-old maid had traded sex for money at the Sofitel Hotel, where she was working when she accused Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her May 14.

The Post also reported that she was placed in the hotel by her union, which the newspaper said received kickbacks from her tricks. The union, in the Post story, denied those claims. Later articles said that she continued to trade sex for money, even while she was housed by prosecutors.

The information was either attributed to anonymous sources or, in some cases, was stated as fact without attribution.

The Post, the lawsuit says, is one of the most influential newspapers in the country, and is read each day by hundreds of thousands of people all over the world.

Meanwhile on Tuesday, the Post reported on Tuesday that Manhattan prosecutors plan to drop all charges against Strauss-Kahn less than a week after publicly losing confidence in the hotel housekeeper who accused him.

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The tabloid cited an unnamed "top investigator in the case" who described the dismissal of charges as "a certainty."

"Her credibility is so bad now, we know we cannot sustain a case with her," the Post's source said. "She is not to be believed in anything that comes out of her mouth -- which is a shame, because now we may never know what happened in that hotel room."

Separately, a young author filed a sex assault complaint against Strauss-Kahn. The lawyer for Tristane Banon, 31, told The Associated Press that he had filed a formal complaint by mail asking prosecutors to open an investigation into her allegation that he tried to rape her in his apartment during a book interview in 2003.

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