Clinton Races to Finish

(CBS)

From CBS News' Fernando Suarez:

INDIANAPOLIS – On primary day in sunny Indianapolis, Hillary Clinton visited one of the country's most popular sporting venues, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where she picked up the endorsement of IndyCar driver Sarah Fisher.

"Oh my goodness," said Clinton as she walked into the crew garage at set her eyes on the baby blue sports racer. Clinton looked on as Fisher explained the ins and outs of the vehicle, including her steering wheel, which has a variety of features like a gear shifter. Clinton admired the technology of the wheel and said that perhaps someday it may apply to civilian cars as well.

Clinton seemed to enjoy the vehicle so much that she asked questions on everything from the race car's speed, to the purpose of the protruding winglets on the side of the car, even commenting on the smoothness of the tires. "These are so smooth," Clinton said as she petted the wheel front-to-back awkwardly.

Fisher told Clinton the car moves upwards of 230 mph to which Clinton blurted, "that's like going into space, almost!"

Clinton's staff reminded reporters prior to her arrival that this was strictly supposed to be a "photo-op" and that Clinton would not take any questions. But after several minutes of clicking the steering wheel and rubbing tires, the press grew antsy and tossed Clinton a few questions.

Clinton was asked what her message today is to the voters if Indiana and North Carolina, and almost on cue Clinton responded with another race metaphor. "We need to get on the track in America and get toward the finish line to change this country. I've said it before, I think there's a good driving analogy. If you want to go forward, you put it in 'D'. If you want to go backward, you put it in 'R.'" Sarah Fisher chimed in, "Just so you know, we don't have reverse in this car." The two looked at each other and laughed.

Clinton tried to brush off other questions but it was difficult since she was positioned before a horde of televisions cameras and reporters. One reporter asked her if she echoes her national campaign chairman's optimism in a victory in Indiana, to which Clinton replied, "He's very exhuberent. I never make predictions. I just try to do the best I can. That's what we all do. We get out there, work hard. You know, you look at this piece of machinery and what Sarah's going to do with it, she's going to do the very best she can and I hope it works out well for her." The Indianapolis 500 race is just two weeks away.

Fisher presented Clinton with a signed helmet which Clinton held in her hands as the cameras snapped pictures. One other reporter shouted to Clinton whether she would stay in the race regardless of the outcome in tonight's race. "Well, I'm looking forward to finding out what happens. You know, I'm always interested in finding out what the voters actually think because there's all kinds of speculation. It would be like predicting who's going to win the Indy 500 before it even started. We don't know. People prepare. They work hard. They do their best. Life is unpredictable. Racing's unpredictable. Politics is unpredictable. So, I'm just going to wait to see what the voters have to say."