Can Lohan Be Helped by Being in Jail?

Lindsay Lohan (AP Photo)

Can jail time help Lindsay Lohan get her life back on track?

The star has been sentenced to 90 days in jail for probation violations from a 2007 drug case.

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But could everything change for the actress behind bars?

Brad Lamm, a board-registered interventionist and the author of "How to Change Someone You Love," says the jail time is an intervention "of sorts."

"I love that, in terms of interrupting the behavior of the drugs," he said. "Whatever nonsense is going on in her life, it's a great way to get in there. At least the judge is acting like an adult in the room. It seems like there's not a lot of those people in her life."

However, Lohan may continue to take doctor-prescribed drugs in jail.

According to her probation report, she's currently taking five powerful medications, including Adderall, Dilaudid and Zoloft.

Lindsay Lohan's father, Michael Lohan, said on "The Early Show" prescription medications are his daughter's very problem.

He told co-anchor Erica Hill this week, "So many doctors have prescribed her so many different things that she never was on and never needed and now she's on them. I couldn't tell you all the names, but Adderall, for one. Adderall is nothing but methamphetamine. For anyone that knows the pharmaceutical business or knows what kids are into these days, adderall is taking over society. It's supposed to an focus medication, but it's speed. And it's polluting society and our teenagers and kids."

Lamm told "Early Show" co-anchor Chris Wragge prescription addiction is the fastest-growing addiction problem in America.

Lamm says letting Lohan keep taking these medications is a "big mistake." He said some of the drugs prescribed to Lohan have high potential for abuse.

Lamm said he'd like to have seen Lohan in jail yesterday or today.

"Sometimes that last window of opportunity is a chance to go blow it out big time before you go in and do your time," he said. "That's my concern, too, is that she'll just view it as doing time instead of taking care of herself and separating herself from the problems that are hurting her."

Lohan will also be held in solitary confinement. And Lamm says that's the best thing for the star's recovery.

"Addiction is a problem of isolation and loneliness," he said. "Hopefully, there are some voices in her life that matter that are trying to help her in some way. And I think love is the best motivator for change if people can get in there and help her in some way, some fashion. The trouble with addiction though, there's so much collateral damage with it. She comes into all her relationships with a deficit, overdrawn trust bank account. So, lots of damaging relationships. Sometimes it's hard to get those folks to even speak up."

Lamm says support from friends and family is important. However, Wragge pointed out, Lohan's family and friends may not be the best people for providing support.

Lamm replied, "I'll tell you, the families I work with -- mine included -- on the outside look like the perfect, all-American families. Their family has played out in the headlines and on TV, but every family has a story. Every family has dysfunction. In that, they can find a loving way to help someone if they can put their personalities to the side."

He added, "I challenge everybody not to give up on the loved one who's addicted. At the end of your rope, there's hope ... We can help someone we love get help."
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