Will beer-like coffee see big success?

There's a new coffee trend brewing and it delivers double the jolt. Adding nitrogen gives the drink qualities of beer, without the alcohol, reports CBS News' Marlie Hall.

From coffee shops to coffee trucks, people are starting their morning like it's Friday night, with a cold frosty brew straight from the tap.

"You've got something that's an adult beverage," Mod Cup Coffee Co. co-owner Justin Hicks said.

Hicks and Travas Clifton started making and selling Nitro coffee less than a year ago.

"Some weekends up at the shop, we'll do three kegs of it on a Sunday," Clifton said.

This summer, more baristas are buying into the nitro trend.

The coffee is cold brewed, put into a keg and then infused with nitrogen and poured from a tap. That nitrogen infusion creates a slightly carbonated cup of coffee with a creamy, beer-like head.

There's no sugar, milk or alcohol -- just coffee, water and twice as much caffeine as a regular cup of joe.

"It's a wild thing to see. They think you're serving Guinness. You're not. It's coffee," Clifton said.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters also serves Nitro from a tap and in cans at their nine cafes.

Director of East Coast Operations John Feldman said they can barely keep up with the demand for Nitro. The company expects sales to triple this year.

"I think its something that's here to stay," Feldman said. "It's a fun way to drink coffee."

The small Portland, Oregon-based coffee chain claims to be the one of the pioneers of Nitro coffee and first introduced it two years ago.

Reporter Oliver Strand writes about coffee for The New York Times and foresees big things for the drink.

"I think that the first coffee company to take Nitro coffee to mass market will be a very successful coffee company," Strand said.

Americans spend $40 billion per year on coffee, with the average coffee drinker spending about $20 each week on their caffeine fix.

But Nitro faces steep competition with the ever expanding menu of options.

"Specialty coffee accounts for between one and three percent of coffee and Nitro coffee accounts for not even one percent of that," Strand said.

Nitro coffee costs about $5 for a 12-oz. serving, but it's still a hit with customers who enjoy it in cafes and on the go.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters is testing its canned version of Nitro in Oregon and California. The company said shipments are selling out every week.