Beaten Giants fan may have brain damage

This undated image provided Tuesday April 5, 2011 by John Stow shows Bryan Stow holding his 12-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter. Bryan Stow, A Giants fan was beaten after last week Dodger home opener, has sustained brain damage as a result and remains in critical condition. The children are unidentified at the request of the source. AP Photo/John Stow

Doctors say a San Francisco Giants fan brutally beaten by a pair of fans of the rival Los Angeles Dodgers outside Dodger Stadium after the season's opening game Thursday may have suffered brain damage.

A $100,000 reward is being offered for information on the savage attack on Bryan Stow, a 42-year-old paramedic and father of two, from Santa Cruz.

Stow was in a medically-induced coma.

And, reports CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy, his family is speaking out for the first time.

Ann Stow, his mother says she "got a call ... that Bryan went to a Dodger game and there was a fight and he's been hurt. And our lives changed."

"Both of (the assailants) pushed Bryan from behind," says Stow's brother-in-law, David Collins. "He never saw them coming. And Bryan fell forward and hit his head on the concrete and was immediately knocked unconscious."

But the beating, says Tracy, went on, and police say a crowd of more than 100 watched before paramedics on bicycles came to Stow's rescue.

Even before the attack, Stow texted family members that the atmosphere inside the stadium was scary compared to home games in San Francisco.

"The safety is not the same," says John Stow, Bryan's cousin. "It's definitely not the same. We knew that, Bryan knew that going into it, but I don't think he could ever imagined that it would be like this."

The Dodgers have turned over surveillance tapes and are working with police to try to catch the two suspects.

"Brian was a wonderful father and a great person," an emotional John Stow said, "a man who's dedicated to helping people and saving people's lives."

Bryan's mother, Ann added, "It's hard to see him in bed like that, because he was sooo funny, and now he just lays there."

Stow has a long recovery ahead, Tracy observes. Doctors say they removed part of his skull to reduce swelling, but any brain damage may be permanent.

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