Amtrak Collision In Chicago, XXX Injuries

An Amtrak passenger train collided with a freight train Friday on the south side of the city, fire officials said.

Approximately 150 passengers were on the Amtrak train when it came to a "very hard stop," Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford said. Fifteen ambulances were on their way to the scene.

Fire Department spokeswoman Eve Rodriguez, speaking to CBS Station WBBM, confirmed a report that a conductor had been pinned inside.

Firefighters could be seen leading passengers away from the train, some of them children holding the hands of adults. Most were walking, but at least one person was taken away on a rolling upright stretcher.

The engine of the Amtrak train was resting on top of the last car of the freight train, but the Amtrak passenger cars remained upright.

Most of the damage was concentrated on the passenger train's engine, Langford said.

The Amtrak train, No. 371 from Grand Rapids, Mich., struck the rear of the parked freight train around 11:32 a.m. at 48th Street and Shields Avenue, Fire Department spokeswoman Eve Rodriguez told CBS Station WBBM.

Fifteen ambulances and a fire-suppression unit were at the scene tending to passengers, and rescuers were inside the train working to assess passengers, officials said. The Fire Department entered into a mass-casualty incident situation and were triaging people on board.

Most of the damage was concentrated on the passenger train's engine, Langford said.

Around noon, rescue crews were using a stretcher to carry out a person who was likely the conductor that was pinned in, Kris Habermehl reported from Chopper 2. Not many others were seen out on stretchers.

"So far nobody is being taken on stretcher. That's a good sign," Langford said. "It looks like everybody is walking."

The engine of the Amtrak train was resting on top of the last car of the freight train. The Amtrak had three double-decker passenger cars, Langford said.

Firefighters carried several children from the accident.

"The passenger cars look to be in great shape, great shape," Langford said.

The cause of the crash - whether mechanical failure or operator error - will be determined at a later time by the National Transportation Safety Board.
CBS AP
  • CBSNews

Comments