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The Gospel Of Judas

This image provided by the National Geographic Society shows the final words on the last page of the codex reading: Gospel of Judas. on display at the Society in Washington. The ancient manuscript rediscovered after 1,700 years may shed new light on the relationship between Jesus and Judas, the disciple who betrayed him.
AP/National Geographic Society
This column was written by CBS News Early Show co-anchor Harry Smith.
It's hard not to be intrigued with the story from the National Geographic that a so-called "Gospel of Judas" has been translated and reveals that Jesus and Judas were partners in Jesus' betrayal.

Judas has always been portrayed as the betrayer — the one who gave Jesus up to local authorities for 30 pieces of silver.

The Gospel of Mathew says Judas Iscariot went to the chief priests. Did he seek them out because he and Jesus had cooked up the betrayal? I wonder.

In the Gospel of Mark, however, Jesus says this: "Woe to that man by whom the son of man is betrayed. Good were it for that man had he never been born"

That's pretty harsh stuff. Either way, it recalls the notion that Jesus needed human help to get to the end he was predestined for. And don't forget: Judas eventually went and hanged himself. If Judas was in on the deal, would he have done that?


Harry's daily commentary can be heard on manyCBS Radio News affiliates across the country.

By Harry Smith