Terabyte Transfer Time: One Second!

Last Updated Oct 10, 2007 8:51 PM EDT

Fiber Optic Cable image courtesy Raymond [GNU, 1.2]A terabyte is a lot of data... but data needs are growing. Many corporations have a need for high-speed networks, and even with the best of broadband, you can get a respectable 150 megabits a second (which is much faster than your typical consumer cable connection). (Download) times are changing though, and Internet2 has perfected their network speeds to achieve a potential 100 gbps. Not only that, but they think they can scale up to a terabyte per second speed. That would equate to transferring the entire Library of Congress in 10 seconds, including images and scans!

I2's speed is achieved by using 10 different wavelengths of light over a fiber optic cable, with plans to eventually use 100 wavelengths. Each wavelength can carry 10 gbps. While the incredible speed would be especially helpful to corporations with large data transfer needs, there has also been concern about its use for good ol' fashioned piracy. The RIAA and MPAA both were apparently afraid enough of I2's incredible bandwidth that it filed hundreds of lawsuits against students attending colleges where I2 is being used. That'll teach the kids to pirate those movies! Yar!

Fiber Optic Cable image courtesy Raymond [GNU, 1.2]