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Kelly Rowland reveals she's expecting her second child: "I'm knocking at 40's door"

Kelly Rowland revealed in the November issue of Women's Health that she is expecting her second child. The four-time Grammy-winning artist, told the magazine that she and her husband, Tim Weatherspoon, "had been talking about it loosely, and then COVID happened, and we were just like, 'Let's see what happens.'" 

Rowland said she became pregnant shortly after. She and her husband share 5-year-old son, Titan Jewell Weatherspoon.

With the pandemic, nationwide racial unrest and a plummeting economy, the singer said she was hesitant to share the news despite her gratitude. However, Rowland ultimately decided to reveal her announcement ."You still want to remind people that life is important," she said. "Being able to have a child…I'm knocking at 40's door in February. Taking care of myself means a lot to me," Rowland continued.

The 39-year-old also thought about her fans after sharing the news. "Oh my god, my fans are gonna be so disappointed...They wanted an album first, but they got a baby," she said. "I was like, 'I have to figure this out so they get both.'" The Destiny's Child alum did confirm that she is planning on releasing a fifth solo album, though she did not divulge a release date. She emphasized her desire for her songs to touch on personal experiences that have made her feel whole, such as her reunion with her biological father, who she hadn't seen in 30 years. 

"I'm learning so much about myself, and the things that I missed," Rowland said." You say, 'I'm fine, I'm fine'—and yeah, I'm fine—but there are things I would have liked to have experienced from a father. That's where the music piece comes in: "I like to touch on everything. I want it to feel very organic, coming from me," she adds.

The deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and others had an overwhelming impact on her family, she said. She said it has made her think about her experience as a mother raising Black sons during a time where racial strife plagues the nation.  

"I promised to protect my kid," Roland said. "That was the main thing I was thinking about: protecting this little innocence."

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