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Girls Scouts: Honest, Fair And Tattooed?

Vermont Gov. James Douglas and his wife, Dorothy, examine flood-damaged roads in Guilford, Vt., during a visit Oct. 9. 2005. Southern Vermont experienced heavy rain showers and flooding over the weekend.
AP Photo/Brattleboro Reformer
The Girl Scouts are looking for a few hip, young women. But with green hair and tattoos?

The Girl Scout Council of Northwest Georgia is chucking its traditional image with an ad campaign aimed at 18- to 34-year-old women who might think it's uncool to volunteer as troop leaders.

Some of the posters and brochures feature a girl with green hair, green eyes and green nail polish. Others show a girl sporting a Girl Scout logo tattoo on her shoulder.

The council doesn't have enough leaders to work with thousands of girls who want to be Scouts in its 20-county area, said Girl Scouts spokeswoman Lisa Hester.

The ads, produced free of charge by two Atlanta ad agencies, will be posted in places where potential Scout leaders are likely to live, work and hang out.

"A lot of women who are young and progressive don't even think about participating and volunteering as Scout leaders," said LaLohni Alsobrook, an account executive at WestWayne Inc., one of the ad agencies.

She said the Girl Scout campaign targets "the same women who would give their time to Hands On Atlanta or Habitat for Humanity."