Live

Watch CBSN Live

Dogs You Don't See Every Day

Dog lovers may think they know a lot about man's best friend.

But, as The Early Show continued its weeklong series, "Early Goes to the Dogs" on Wednesday, its resident veterinarian, Dr. Debbye Turner, had four very unique breeds of canine -- on the catwalk!

No matter what the breed, Turner stressed, "You really need to do the research and find out what that dog was bred to do and match the dog's natural abilities to your family and your lifestyle. You get a good match, you've got a great family member. A bad match? Then you've got tough times."

BASENJI
Origin: Africa
Height: 16-17 inches
Weight: 22-26 lbs
Life Expectancy: 10-12 yrs

CHINESE CRESTED

Origin: Africa
Height: 12 inches
Weight: not over 10 lbs
Life Expectancy: 10-12 yrs

PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

Origin: France
Height: 13-15 inches
Weight: 31-40 lbs
Life Expectancy: 14 yrs +

OTTERHOUND

Origin: England
Height: 24-27 inches
Weight: 80-115 lbs
Life expectancy: 11-13 yrs

For more on these and so many other canine breeds, visit the Web site of the American Kennel Club.

BASENJI

What kind of temperament do these dogs have?

The Basenji is alert, affectionate, demanding, energetic and curious. It loves to play and makes a good pet, as long as it is handled regularly from an early age. It is very intelligent, responds well to training with a strong desire to please. They can be reserved with strangers. The Basenji is somewhat aloof, but can also form strong bonds with people. It should not be trusted with non-canine pets. They are usually patient, but do best with older considerate children. The Basenji dislike wet weather. They like to chew, so giving them lots of toys of their own would be a good idea. The breed likes to climb and can easily get over chain wire fences. Basenji are very clever at getting their own way, they succeed less by obstinacy than by charm. It has the unique properties of not barking (it makes a low, liquid ululation instead) and of cleaning itself like a cat. It can be described as speedy, frisky, tireless at play and teasing the owner into play. Their strong desire to play can lead to behavior problems if left alone. Most Basenji problems usually involve a mismatch between owner and pet. The owners mistake the adjective "quiet' to mean inactive instead of noiseless; thus, they become harassed by an active, though relatively silent , dog.

What are they were bred to do?

The first traces of a dog similar to the Basenji are found in Egyptian tombs and wall drawings of five thousand years ago. Also called the Congo Dog, it was brought to Europe in 1934. English breeders refined it and exported it all over the world. In Africa, it is used as a guide in the forests, to warn against the approach of dangerous animals, and as a very active pack-hunting dog of small game.

How big do they get?

The Basenji grows to a height of between 16-17 inches for males and from 15-16 inches for females. They weigh 22-26 pounds for males. The females weighs from 20-25 pounds.

How long do they typically live?

About 10-12 years

What family situation or lifestyle is most suited for this breed?

The Basenji will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. It is very active indoors and a small yard will do. The Basenji is happiest when it is kept with two or three other Basenji; they will not fight among themselves.The Basenji need vigorous daily exercise. They have a tendency to become fat and lazy unless the owner is consistent about it. This breed needs a long daily walk. The Basenji is an alert, affectionate dog. This breed makes a good family pet, especially a family with active children.

Any other quirks and interesting facts about the Basenji?

The feet are usually white. The white color repeats on the chest and the tip of the tail. The forehead is furrowed with wrinkles, giving the breed a worried look. The tail is set high and curled.

CHINESE CRESTED

What kind of temperament do these dogs have?

The most popular of the hairless breed, the Chinese Crested are still very rare. These dogs are sweet, lively, playful and cuddly. They are exceptionally loving and likes to hug and smile. Affectionate with children. Children should be taught not to be rough with this breed as it is friendly, but it does not have the protective hair that other breeds have and can get injured easily. They are an entertaining companion. Intelligent and very alert. Puppies should be well-socialized and exposed to loud noises when young to avoid potential timidity. If its owners do not baby them, these dogs can grow up to be a very well-adjusted dog. They have an ability to perform tricks and are generally good with other pets. They are not barkers. Chinese Crested Dogs like to climb and dig holes. They tend to become very attached to their owners and have difficulty adjusting to a new one. Chinese Crested Dogs crave constant companionship

What were they were bred to do?

The Chinese Crested originated in Africa where they were called "African Hairless Terriers." The ancient Aztecs kept them as bedwarmers, and believe it or not, did eat them. The Chinese trading ships stopped along Africa on their routes, and it was there that they picked up these dogs because they were excellent ratters for aboard their ships. They renamed the dogs "Chinese Crested" and the name stuck. The stripper, Gypsy Rose Lee, used to breed Chinese Crested. This unusual breed was first exhibited in the West in 1885, but the first American breed club was not established until 1979. Full AKC recognition was granted in 1991. The similar Mexican Hairless was formerly recognized by the AKC, but is no longer recognized. The Chinese Crested Dog has been gaining popularity as a cheerful companion dog in both the United Stated and England. The breed is a frequent competitor in rare breed dog shows. Four hairless breeds are known in the U.S. today: The Chinese Crested, the Mexican Hairless, the Inca Hairless Dog, and the Peruvian Inca Orchid.

How big do they get?

Height: 12 inches

Weight: not over 10 pounds

How long do they typically live?

About 10-12 years.

What family situation or lifestyle is most suited for this breed?

Good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They should wear a sweater in cold weather. Although it is tempting to carry these dainty creatures about; these are active little dogs, who need a daily walk Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs who do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display a wide array of behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced in yard. Don't think that just because he is small he should be confined to a small space.

Any other quirks and interesting facts about Chinese Crested?

The "crest" in its name refers to a copious shock of silky hair that graces the dog's head.The Chinese Crested is found everywhere, but has never reached great popularity. It has often been exhibited in circuses and carnivals as a "freak." However, this little dog has many assets that go unrecognized.

GO TO PAGE 2 FOR DETAILS ON THE PETIT BASSETT GRIFFON AND THE OTTERHOUND

PETIT BASSET GRIFFON

What kind of temperament do these dogs have?

The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen, sometimes called the "Little Griffon Vendeen Basset" is merry, friendly and always very busy exploring. Very intelligent, but independent. Bold and lively; compact and robust. He's a dog that needs 'people attention' and will demand it if his owner neglects him. The PBGV is basically a pack animal and much of his behavior reflects this heritage.It has a casual appearance, but is always alert. It can be willful, but a charming rascal. Curious and completely confident. The dog must be well-secured, as he is a renowned digger, jumper and escape artist. They are generally good with other dogs, but should not be trusted with non-canine pets. You may have heard that PBGV's are hard to train. This is not true! The PBGV is intelligent and can be trained for many purposes. He also has a great desire to please. The problem for the owner is that the dog is so smart that he often has his own agenda (which may not be the same as the owners!) They are good with children and are fairly friendly with strangers. A bored or lonely PBGV will make his own 'entertainment'. Giving your dog a variety of toys and things to chew on, a safe environment and eliminating the opportunity to be destructive will control this potential problem. The use of a crate not only provides this safety, but it also becomes his own special place.

What were they were bred to do?

The Petit Basset has its ancient origins in the Vendee region of France. In 1947 its characteristics were fixed by Abel Desamy, a French breeder. The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen is a small (Petit), low (Basset), wire-haired (Griffon), French (from the Vendeen region) scent hound, used primarily for hunting rabbit. The PBGV was developed from the white St. Hubert and the white & tan Italian hound. Also the "King's White" Grand Griffon which is a larger, heavier, and longer Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen. The two breeds were often bred together in the past, so even though crossing them has been prohibited since 1975, puppies representing both types may still arise from a single litter. Though the Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen has been a very popular hunting dog in France for almost a century, the breed is relatively new to the United States. The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Club of America was formed in 1984, and the breed entered the Hound Group of the AKC in 1991.

How big do they get?

Height: 13-15 inches

Weight: 31-40 pounds

How long do they typically live?

About 14 or more years

What family situation or lifestyle is most suited for this breed?

Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and do well in most climates, but prefer cooler weather. This is one breed that should not be allowed to be off lead. The hunting instinct is too strong. All that is needed is one small scent and your hunter will be off on the chase. Having a secure fenced in yard is a very good idea. The PBGV like to dig and can be great escape artists. Watch for small holes and/or signs of interest along the fence line. He would as soon go under as he would to go over.

OTTERHOUNDS

What kind of temperament these dogs have?

They are people and pet friendly. They are outgoing and happy dogs.The Otterhound standard says that the breed is "amiable, boisterous and even tempered". Basically these are big friendly dogs, but with a mind of their own. Otterhounds are affectionate, but don't demand attention all the time. If you're in search of a very loving dog, you might find OHs too independent. Left to their own devices, OHs can be very good at entertaining themselves - but be warned that it may be in ways that you and your neighbors won't find acceptable, such as excavating or baying.
Otterhounds are generally good with other dogs and with other animals if they are raised with them or introduced to them carefully. Many Otterhound owners also have cats, and contrary to what some sources may lead you to believe, they usually get along well; some Otterhounds live happily with parrots, horses and pigs. These hounds are quite willing to include most two and four legged members of the household in their notion of their "pack". Otterhounds can be good with kids, but a young Otterhound is big and likely to be klutzy and may not be the best companion for a wobbly toddler or a frail elderly person.Otterhounds benefit from a lot of socialization, especially when they're puppies, but continuing throughout their lives. So if you bring an Otterhound into your home, include it in your life!

What were they bred to do?

The Otterhound is an old British breed, with references dating back to the 12th century. They were used in large packs to hunt river otter. King John of England hunted otter with large, shaggy hounds, as did Queen Elizabeth I. The modern Otterhound has Bloodhound in his background, and is in turn one of the ancestors of the Airedale Terrier. The first Otterhounds were brought to the US very early in the 20th century, with official AKC recognition in 1907. There are fewer than 1000 Otterhounds world wide, with the largest numbers in the UK and US, and smaller populations in Scandinavia, the Netherlands and the rest of Europe, Canada, and Australia.

How big do they get?

The Otterhound is a large, strong breed (with a considerable size range within the breed). Males are generally in the 95 to 115 pound range and 26-28 inches at the shoulder, with females 65 to 90 pounds and 24-26 inches at the shoulder.

How long do they typically live?

Otterhounds have a relatively long life span of 10 to 13 years with some living to 15 or older. Like most large breeds, they are subject to hip dysplasia and bloat. There have been a few records ofOtterhounds with bleeding disorders. This breed is usually quite slow to mature, both physically and mentally.

What family situation or lifestyle is most suited for this breed?

They need activity. They need both physical and mental stimulation. They are not needy. They are very independent. They need the ability to run in the yard, so the owner needs a fenced in yard. A otterhound is not for someone who is obsessed with their house. They can be messy. We keep barn towels by the door to clean them up before they come back inside. Otterhounds look like an unmade bed and that's when they are well-groomed.

Otterhounds make great pets, if --
-- you have a sense of humor (and a fair amount of patience).
-- you aren't obsessed with keeping your house/clothes spotless.
-- you have a fenced yard.
-- you just love that hound voice (and so do your neighbors!).
-- you are looking for a pet and watchdog - but NOT a guard dog.

Any other quirks and interesting facts about Otterhounds?

So what is the special attraction of Otterhounds? For many, it's the great personality. You need a sense of humor to live with an Otterhound, but you'll be living with a dog that has a pronounced sense of humor of its own. Otterhound owners comment on the amount of laughter in their homes, most of it due to the resident shaggy-coated hound. These dogs can look noble, even mournful, but along the lines of the "class clown" trying very hard to be good. The standard says an Otterhound head shows great dignity; it doesn't point out that looks can be wildly deceiving! Think of the teacher or grandparent who you loved, very dignified in appearance, who had the heart of a joyful child, and you've glimpsed the Otterhound personality. To assess whether you could live happily with an Otterhound, ask yourself if you can love and perhaps admire an independent dog who will love you, but will NOT worship the ground you walk on. Most Otterhounds will greet you happily when you come home, but then are content to return to napping in the most comfortable spot in the house.
MMVIII, CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved