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Do You Believe in Rejection? Too Bad.


Here's a key secret to sales success: rejection isn't real

You heard me right. Rejection is an illusion. It doesn't exist. It's an half-baked attempt by your brain to impose a reason for an event that has nothing to do with you.

If you can free your mind from that illusion, you'll be far more successful in sales.

Let me explain.

Fear of rejection is the bane of sales success. If rejections scare you, you'll avoid cold-calling, balk at hard bargaining and hesitate to close.

Suppose you make a cold call and the prospect hangs up on you. While that's a textbook definition of "rejection", the truth is that the prospect's reaction has nothing to do with you.

What's actually happened is that you accidentally broke the prospect's rules. You had no way of knowing that the prospect was busy and that the prospect thinks it's OK to hang up on unfamiliar callers.

Now it may very well be true that if you said something different or called at a different time, you might have made a sale, but that's just a fiction that you're making up in your mind.

If you had called at a different time, the prospect might just as easily have added a expletive before hanging up and then sent a memo directing the company to never buy from you ever again.

The prospect's reaction really didn't have anything to do you with personally, because anybody else taking the same action at the same time would have gotten the exact same result. You simply you took an action that didn't work.

The "rejection" part of the story is just a hallucination that your emotions are creating in order to "explain" what happened.

The problem with fear of rejection is that, once it's got hold of you, it gets stronger and more debilitating the higher you set your sights.

Once you realize that "rejection" is just an illusion, you can focus on noticing what works and what doesn't, and on changing your approach to make the most of what you've got to offer.

READERS: Do you get this concept? It's pretty darn important.

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