World Cup Welcome: A Billion Condoms and 40,000 Sex Workers

Prostitutes wait at a bar in a plush northern suburb of Johannesburg August 22, 2002. [A much-publicised and stepped-up police presence could slash the incomes of sex workers who had hoped to cash in on a massive United Nations summit in Johannesburg later this month. Prostitution is illegal in South Africa.] © Juda Ngwenya / Reuters

Prostitutes wait at a bar in a plush northern suburb of Johannesburg August 22, 2002.
Juda Ngwenya / Reuters
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- The taxi drivers hustling around the bars on Long Street in Cape Town say they are ready for all the soccer fans that will flood the city in June for the World Cup. So are hotels, restaurants, breweries and, inevitably, prostitutes.

Arguably, the soccer World Cup is to the sex industry what the holiday season is to candy shops, a temporary surge of excited people feeling collectively festive, willing to pay for a bit of extra indulgence.

South Africa's Drug Central Authority estimates 40,000 sex workers will trickle in for the event from as far as Russia, the Congo and Nigeria to cater to the wide taste spectrum of some 400,000, mostly male, visitors and their apres-soccer needs.

Henry Africa, 49, drives a taxi in Cape Town and, aside from the usual airport pickups and winery tours, he also operates the "Bright Red Tour," which he expects to be a hit among soccer fans. For the equivalent of 500 dollars, he'll shuttle customers from strip bar to strip bar all night and even bring them over to a safe-sex practicing prostitute, a relevant selling point in a country where one in five adults are estimated to be HIV positive.

Read the whole soccer and sex story at Global Post.

  • Global Post

Comments

Watch CBSN Live

Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.