The Tragedy of Haiti

The Scope of the Disaster - and the Response - Can't Be Totaled In Just Numbers

Five days after the earthquake in Haiti, the enormity of the bare numbers seems too much to comprehend. Some 140,000 lie dead -- tens of thousands of bodies are still entombed beneath the rubble. And an ever-dwindling handful of survivors lie with them, trapped alive, awaiting either rescue or death.

In Port-Au-Prince, 300,000 citizens have no home but the streets. More than three-and-a-half million Haitians, according to the Red Cross, find their lives turned inside out by the quake and its aftermath.

Complete Coverage: Devastation in Haiti
Haiti Quake: How You can Help
Web Extra: Makeshift Morgue
Web Extra: City of Ruins
Web Extra: With the 82nd Airborne
Web Extra: Triage
Web Extra: Homecoming

This weekend, help is flowing into Haiti; the trickle has become a stream. Hundreds of thousands of meals have been distributed. Three U.S. government water purification systems are up and running. And by Monday morning some 12,000 American troops will be on station, organizing and distributing relief.

But the tragedy of Haiti and the scope of the response are not something that can be totaled in numbers. They are, as our Byron Pitts has discovered, best understood through the eyes of the people who have come to offer help. Much of what they're seeing is difficult to watch, but this is the reality of Haiti.



Full segment:


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Web Extra: Makeshift Morgue


Watch CBS News Videos Online


Web Extra: City of Ruins


Watch CBS News Videos Online


Web Extra: With the 82nd Airborne


Watch CBS News Videos Online


Web Extra: Triage


Watch CBS News Videos Online


Web Extra: Homecoming


Watch CBS News Videos Online
Produced by Harry Radliffe, Jenny Dubin and Magalie Laguerre Wilkinson
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