Stephen Colbert super PAC urges S.C. to vote for Herman Cain

UPDATED 11:39 a.m. ET

The super PAC of comedian Stephen Colbert, which has been legally transferred to humor sensei Jon Stewart, is urging voters in South Carolina to choose former candidate Herman Cain in the January 21 Republican presidential primary.

The ad notes that the Palmetto state primary is less than a week away, and South Carolinians are "frustrated" because "there is still no candidate for us. Plus, the economy."

"Americans for a better tomorrow, tomorrow believes a vote for Herman Cain is a vote for America," the ad says, using the PAC's official name. Pictures of Colbert are shown throughout the ad and Cain is never seen.

"He's not a career politician. He's such a Washington outsider he's not even running for president," the ad intones, using a clip from Political Hotsheet to make the point.

"Send them a message. On Jan. 21, vote Herman Cain," the ad says, with the comedian producing a long, slow grin that Cain made famous to end the spot.

The ad comes on the heels of another Colbert Super PAC ad, likening front-runner Mitt Romney to legendary serial killer Jack the Ripper.

In the ad, labelled Mitt the Ripper, the narrator says "if Mitt Romney really believes 'corporations are people too, my friend' then Mitt Romney is a serial killer."

The ad cited Romney's work at Bain Capital, the investment firm Romney headed for 15 years in the 1980s and 1990s. Narrator John Lithgow said "as head of Bain Capital, he bought companies, carved them up and got rid of what he couldn't use."

"If you believe corporations are people, do your duty and protect them. On Saturday January 21, stop Mitt the Ripper before he kills again," the ad said.

Colbert played the ad on his television program Monday night, poking fun at super PAC system.

"If one word of that ad is inaccurate, I hope he takes it off the air and leaves it on the Internet," Colbert said, referring to Stewart.

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