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Report: Japan nuke plant water leaks stopped

In this Friday, April 1, 2011 photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), a TEPCO employee points at a crack newly discovered in a maintenance pit on the edge of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. The crack was apparently caused by the March 11 earthquake and may have been leaking since then, said the company's spokesman Osamu Yokokura.
AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.
In this Friday, April 1, 2011 photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), a TEPCO employee points at a crack newly discovered in a maintenance pit on the edge of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. The crack was apparently caused by the March 11 earthquake and may have been leaking since then, said the company's spokesman Osamu Yokokura.
In this Friday, April 1, 2011 photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), a TEPCO employee points at a crack newly discovered in a maintenance pit on the edge of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan.
AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex said on Wednesday it had stopped leaks of contaminated water with high levels of radiation into the ocean, Reuters reports.

On Monday, workers began using a milky bathwater dye as they frantically tried to trace the path of the radioactive water seeping into the ocean from the tsunami-damaged nuclear plant.

The crack in a maintenance pit discovered over the weekend was the latest confirmation that radioactivity continues to spill into the environment. The leak is a symptom of the primary difficulty at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex: Radioactive water is pooling around the plant and preventing workers from powering up cooling systems needed to stabilize dangerously vulnerable fuel rods.

The plant operators also deliberately dumped 10,000 tons of tainted water -- measuring about 500 times above the legal limit for radioactivity -- into the ocean Monday to make space at a storage site for water that is even more highly radioactive.

Nuclear plant dumps radioactive water into the sea
Complete coverage: Disaster in Japan

The contaminated water dissipates quickly in the ocean but could pose a danger to workers at the plant.