Report: Democratic party hack was wider than believed

The cyber breach of the Democratic National Committee's servers may well have been a larger operation than previously thought, the New York Times reported Thursday.

According to the Times, the FBI has widened its investigation of the hack, informing a "long list" of Democratic officials that Russian hackers may have penetrated their personal accounts. That includes the private emails of more than 100 party officials and groups like the Democratic Governors' Association.

House and Senate Intelligence Committee members have already received briefings from the FBI about the stolen emails, and other congressional committees are likely to receive their own briefings in the future.

The Democratic party is still feeling the effects of the hack's initial document dump on WikiLeaks.

Several aides have departed the national committee over seemingly biased views of the Bernie Sanders campaign during the Democratic primary.

The three aides, who resigned last week, were only the latest officials shamed in the DNC scandal. Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the national chair, also stepped down last month, just as the Democratic convention in Philadelphia kicked off.

Earlier this week, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat, seemed to slam her party's response to the cyber attacks.

"What happened over the Democratic national party should not have happened," Warren said during a Sunday interview on WCVB-TV. But she expressed hope that the DNC's new acting chair, Donna Brazile, would turn the party around.

"She's not going to be pushed around in that job," Warren said. "I think she's going to evaluate what we need at the Democratic Party and I'm grateful for that. We need some to get in there and clean house."