Papal stumble and scrutiny as new pope steps into spotlight

Pope Francis almost took a fall on one of his first days as the Catholic Church leader. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, backed the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act and now he's changed his mind. Also, the Dow Jones soars for its tenth straight day. All that, and all that matters, in today's "Eye Opener."

(CBS News) The newly elected Pope Francis held an audience at St. Peter's Basilica for the cardinals gathered in Rome Friday morning. He had a slight misstep and stumbled as he stepped down from the altar to greet the cardinals at Mass. He quickly regained his footing but not before his trip was captured for the world to see.

The increased scrutiny that comes with his role as pope has resurfaced issues from Francis' past, including claims regarding his role during Argentina's so-called "dirty war," when a military junta killed thousands of Argentinians, including priests. Francis has been accused of not doing enough to protect them.

Special Section: Change at the Vatican

Reporters in Argentina have also tracked down the elderly woman he allegedly wanted to marry -- and who reportedly received love letters from the Francis -- when they were both young teenagers.

On more substantive issues such as church reform, Vatican-watchers say the new pope has already set a significantly different tone in his first days as pontiff. CBS News' Allen Pizzey reports that many believe Francis is simplifying the papacy, wearing his own cross and disdaining the traditional and ornate papal robes. He has urged the faithful in his home country of Argentina to save the money they might spend on a trip to Rome for his installation next week and donate it to the poor instead.

The papal apartments, which were simply decorated under Pope Benedict XVI, were unsealed Friday, and Francis is set to move in during the next several days.

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