More On The Census

census immigrants immigration generic CBS/AP

Adults and teens will spend nearly five months next year watching television, surfing the Internet, reading daily newspapers and listening to personal music devices. That's only one of thousands of nuggets of information on Americana and the world in the U.S. Census Bureau's Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2007.

What is the statistical abstract?
The Statistical Abstract is a collaborative effort that showcases the government statistics and the work of the international community, private industry and nonprofit agency researchers.

The Statistical Abstract includes topics as diverse as condo and mobile home sales to new tables on alternative work schedules and the North American cruise industry. Overall, the book features more than 1,400 tables and charts on social, political and economic facts about the United States, and the latest available international statistics.


What are some of the notable findings?
  • In 2004, people made more than 1.1 billion trips to physicians' offices, hospital outpatient departments and emergency rooms.
  • More than 65 million people did volunteer work in 2005, devoting a median of 50 hours a year to religious, educational and other activities. Older Americans (age 65 and over) did the most work — 96 hours.
  • Active-duty strength for the U.S. armed forces in 2005 included 493,000 in the Army, 354,000 in the Air Force, 363,000 in the Navy and 180,000 Marines.
  • The U.S. Postal Service handled 211.7 billion pieces of mail in 2005, nearly double the 106.3 billion carried in 1980.
  • Among graduate students, 27 percent had at least one foreign-born parent. The number of foreign students from India enrolled in American colleges soared to 80,000 in 2005 from 10,000 in 1976.


  • To learn more about the Census:
    • You can read some of the statistical abstract here.

    • Click here for more resources from the Census.

    • You can read more statistics about Americans at the Census.

    • Click here for a comprehensive look at America's economic, sociological and racial breakdown.

    • Melissa McNamara

    Comments

    Follow Us

    On Twitter