Meds Involved in Tiger Woods Accident?

This is an Aug. 15, 2006, file photo showing Tiger Woods taking a drink of Gatorade on the driving range after his practice round for the 88th PGA Championship, in Medinah, Ill. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File) AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi

The solid wall of privacy that once surrounded tiger woods continues to crumble, almost two weeks after the golf superstar crashed his car into a fire hydrant and tree near his Florida home -- an accident that quickly led to allegations of extramarital affairs.

The New York Daily News says at least seven women are now claiming to have had romantic relationships with Woods.

And the Web site The Daily Beast says there are indications prescription drugs may have contributed to his accident.

On "The Early Show" Monday, Gerald Posner, the site's chief investigative correspondent, told co-anchor Harry Smith, "Somebody familiar with Tiger's medical treatment, back at the end of 2007, right after he tore his ligament in his left knee, around the time of the British Open, to the end of the year, said that he was dosing with prescription pain killers, opiates, at a time that one doctor was concerned enough about potential addictive possibility that he had a person personal talk with Tiger to ramp down the dosing.

"And then at the time of the car accident, I spoke withdraw made trauma doctors who said when EMT (emergency medical technicians) arrived, what they should have found, you've hit a hydrant, you've smashed into a tree, the rear of your car's been broken with a golf club by your wife, you have lacerations on your face, what happens? Your adrenal glands pump out adrenalin. It shoves blood into your brain and your muscles, and you're hyper-vigilant. That happens whether you're 75 or 15 years old. For a 33-year-old world-class athlete like Tiger Woods, he should have been up and around, walking and very alert, with the adrenalin rush. ... (But) he (was found) laying on the grass, snoring. He fell asleep, which raises the questions for some doctors -- was he on sleep agents or possibly on pain medications that may have dulled him? And we can't find out, because the Florida Highway Patrol didn't do a breathalyzer, a blood test or a urine test that night."

Click on the video below to see the full Posner interview, including another possible explanation put forth by Smith of Woods' reported condition when medics arrived at the scene of his accident:


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