Jackie Kennedy's '60s views shock granddaughters

Former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis relaxes in a chair in December 1960, a few weeks after John F. Kennedy won the presidential election. AFP/Getty Images

Updated at 12:57 p.m.

NEW YORK - Caroline Kennedy says her daughters were "horrified" by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' old-fashioned view of the role of women in taped interviews released this week.

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In the 1964 interviews with Arthur Schlesinger Jr., the young widow described her marriage as "a rather terribly Victorian or Asiatic relationship" and said she got all her opinions from her husband, President John F. Kennedy.

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ABC News reports that the former first lady also gave Schlesinger her view on the place of women in politics at the time.

"I think women should never be in politics. We're just not suited to it," she said on the tapes, according to ABC.

Caroline Kennedy said Wednesday on ABC's "Good Morning America" that her two daughters were "absolutely horrified" when they listened to that portion of the tapes.

She said they asked: "Did she really think that?"

But Caroline Kennedy says the tapes are "just a snapshot of a world we barely recognize."

The audio recordings are being released Wednesday along with a book, "Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life With John F. Kennedy."

"This book shows Jackie Kennedy unplugged," historian and CBS News analyst Douglas Brinkley told CBS' "The Early Show" Monday.

(Watch at left)

"A lot of the rawness of her feelings, I think, as a young woman -- she's is only in her 30s when she is doing these tapes in 1964 -- is very different from the more poised and discreet Jackie Kennedy we got to know in the 1980s and 1990s," Brinkley told "Early Show" co-anchor Erica Hill.

Brinkley told Hill he "was close to Arthur Schlesinger, the professor. He died a few years ago. Ted Sorensen, one of the other keepers of the flame, died, and I think Caroline Kennedy thought, it's the 50th anniversary right now of the Kennedy presidency, and this is sitting there, and it was time to let her mother have her say, and decided to come public with this."

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