crimesider

DNA test doesn't match D.B. Cooper suspect, says FBI

This is an artist's sketch of the skyjacker known as 'Dan Cooper' and 'D.B. Cooper', created from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle on Nov. 24, 1971, Thanksgiving eve. 'Cooper' later parachuted from the plane with $200,000 in ransom money. Dead or alive, he has not been found. AP Photo/FBI

This is an artist's sketch of the skyjacker known as 'Dan Cooper' and 'D.B. Cooper', from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle, Nov. 24, 1971, Thanksgiving eve. 'Cooper' later parachuted from the plane with $200,000 in ransom money. Dead or alive, he has not been found.
This is an artist's sketch of the skyjacker known as 'Dan Cooper' and 'D.B. Cooper', from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle, Nov. 24, 1971, Thanksgiving eve. 'Cooper' later parachuted from the plane with $200,000 in ransom money. Dead or alive, he has not been found.
AP Photo/FBI

(CBS/AP) OLYMPIA, Wash. - The FBI says DNA samples found on the tie of the legendary hijacker known as D.B. Cooper do not match a new suspect in the case.

According to Special Agent Fred Gutt, the test does not necessarily rule out the deceased suspect because investigators do not know for sure whether DNA on the tie is indeed that of the hijacker. The tie has three different DNA samples and it's possible it had been used previously by other people, Gutt says.

In addition to DNA testing, fingerprint testing of the suspect proved inconclusive. The FBI says they are working with the suspect's family members to identify items that could be tested further for fingerprints.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the hijacker bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle. This is where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man since known as D.B. Cooper parachuted from the plane.

  • Casey Glynn

Comments

Follow Us

Watch CBSN Live

Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.