City of Atlantis found just in time for TV special?

Richard Freund and his team will unveil their discoveries on "Finding Atlantis" on NatGeo channel CNET

Richard Freund and his team will unveil their discoveries on "Finding Atlantis" on NatGeo channel
Richard Freund and his team will unveil their discoveries on "Finding Atlantis" on NatGeo channel
CNET

(CBS) - Has the lost city of Atlantis finally been found?

A U.S.-led research team claims they have discovered the remains of what might be the mythical city in a swamp in southern Spain, according to Reuters. They theorize a massive tsunami sent the city to its watery grave thousands of years ago.

The site is 60 miles inland in an area of mud flats. The distance from the coast could be evidence of the tremendous destruction tsunamis can bring.

"This is the power of tsunamis," head research Richard Freund told Reuters. "It is just so hard to understand that it can wipe out 60 miles inland, and that's pretty much what we're talking about."

The team used ground-penetrating satellite images to discover the ruins buried in the swampy earth. The marshland, known as Dona Ana Park, is where the team believes they have pinpointed the ancient city.

Of course, according to the ancient Greek philosopher Plato, Atlantis is believed to have been an island. But Freund's team recently discovered "memorial cities" in central Spain they claim were built by survivors of Atlantis in the original city's image.

"We found something that no one else has ever seen before, which gives it a layer of credibility, especially for archeology, that makes a lot more sense," Freund told Reuters.

There are, as readers will no doubt guess, a lot of "ifs" and "maybes" in the report. Critical readers may also not be surprised that this announcement precedes the premier of "Finding Atlantis," a new special on the National Geographic Channel starring Freund and his team.

The debates over whether Atlantis even exists have gone on since ancient times. The only historical source of information about the fabled city are Plato's "dialogues" in which he famously writes that the city "in a single day and night... disappeared into the depths of the sea."

He probably would have made a great TV host.

Catch the full story on the National Geographic channel.

  • Bailey Johnson

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