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Books: 'Miracle on 49th Street'

This is where you can get information about books featured on The Early Show that don't have their own, separate stories.

Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2006

"Miracle on 49th Street"


For more than 30 years, sports columnist Mike Lupica has been writing mainly for grownups. But he's captured another audience with his recent best-selling novels for teens.

In his third and latest, "Miracle on 40th Street," Lupica writes about a 12-year-old girl looking for her father.

He visited The Early Show to discuss the book with co-anchor Hannah Storm.

To see the segment, click here.

To read an excerpt
, click here.



Thursday, Oct. 19, 2006

"50+: Igniting a Revolution to Reinvent America"


There are 78 million baby boomers in the United States. Bill Novelli, CEO of AARP, sees aging as an opportunity for the 50-plus generation to take advantage of its knowledge and start making changes that will impact our children and the way they will live.

Novelli is the author of "Fifty Plus, Igniting a Revolution to Reinvent America," and discussed it on The Early Show with Rene Syler.

To read an excerpt, click here.

To watch the segment, click here.



Thursday, Oct. 19, 2006

"Women Confidential: Midlife Women Explode the Myths of Having It All"


As the first generation of women groomed "to have it all" hits midlife, many women are left wondering about the choices they've made and what the future holds for them personally and professionally.

Author Barbara Moses explores the daily challenges midlife women face in her latest book, "Women Confidential: Midlife Women Explode the Myths of Having It All."

She talked about it on The Early Show with co-anchor Hannah Storm.

To read an excerpt
, click here.

To see the segment, click here.



Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2006

"Backyard Lumberjack," by Frank Philbrick and Stephen Philbrick


A lot of us are looking for a cheaper way to heat our homes than with oil or natural gas. So, wood stoves are getting popular again, despite the recent fall in oil prices. And Frank Philbrick says, go out and cut the wood yourself!

He explains how to be a lumberjack in "The Backyard Lumberjack: the Ultimate Guide to Felling, Bucking, Splitting, and Stacking."

Philbrick gave some basics and a brief demonstration on The Early Show on splitting wood to heat your home or just to make a fire in the fireplace.

He helped his father prepare wood to heat their house in Massachusetts for more than 20 years, and lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. now, but hasn't lost his passion for the woods.

To watch the segment, click here.

To read an excerpt, click here.



Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006

"Outside the Box," a memoir by former ABC News correspondent Lynn Sherr


A true pioneer for women in the broadcast journalism business, former ABC News correspondent Lynn Sherr, writes about 40 years covering news in her memoir, "Outside the Box."

When Sherr first tried to get a job in journalism, she was told, "Sorry, we don't hire girls."

Since then, she's traveled all over the world, covering space shots, presidential elections, and much more.

Sherr reflected on her career, and discussed her new book, on The Early Show.

To watch the segment, click here.

To read excerpts and more, click here.



Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006

"War on the Middle Class," by Lou Dobbs


Who do politicians really listen to these days? CNN anchor Lou Dobbs says both major parties pay too much attention to people with money, and the majority of Americans suffer because of that. He explains in a new book, "War on the Middle Class."

To read an excerpt, click here.

To watch the segment, click here.



"Ageless: The Naked Truth About Bioidentical Hormones," by Suzanne Somers

Getting older can be hard. You can tell just by the way people talk about it: "I'm pushing 40" or "Made it to 60." Well, Suzanne Somers says it's time to embrace the aging process, with a little help. She writes about it in her new book, "Ageless: The Naked Truth About Bioidentical Hormones."

For more on the book, including a brief excerpt, click here.

To see the segment, click here.



Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2006

"Why We Want You To Be Rich," by Donald Trump and Robert Kiyosaki


What do you get when two of the world's best-selling business authors team up to write a book? Perhaps you find some advice to help make you rich. That's what Donald Trump and Robert Kiyosaki are hoping, since they have titled their first-ever collaboration "Why We Want You To Be Rich."

Actually, the book's stated goal is to inspire you to be rich, perhaps so you can help shoulder the burden of caring for an unprecedented wave of poor. Kiyosaki and Trump write mostly about the importance of educating ourselves financially, since many of us know little to nothing about money

Recommendations include finding a focus for your investments as opposed to diversifying. Warren Buffet is quoted several times in this book declaring "Diversification is protection against ignorance. (It) makes little sense if you know what you are doing."

Trump, a business executive and entrepreneur, is the CEO of Trump Organization, a New York-based real estate company. He recently enjoyed a great deal of publicity following the success of his reality television show, "The Apprentice," for which he serves as both executive producer and host.

Kiyosaki is an investor, businessman, self-help author, and motivational speaker. He and Trump met at a Learning Annex gathering in Chicago. Kiyosaki is best known for his "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" series of motivational books and other material. He has written 18 books, which combined have sold more than 26 million copies.

For much more about the book and its authors, go to its official Web site.

To watch the appearance of Trump and Kiyosaki on The Early Show, click here.

To read an excerpt (.pdf file), click here.



"The Real Deal: My Life in Business and Philanthropy," by former Citigroup Chairman Sandy Weill

There's love, intrigue, jealousy, money, power, greed and philanthropy. No, it's not the latest thriller. It's a new autobiography: "The Real Deal: My Life in Business and Philanthropy" by Sandy Weill, the former chairman of Citigroup.

Weill founded his first company in 1960 with just $30,000. He has been chairman of the board of trustees for Carnegie Hall since 1991, and of Cornell Medical College since 1996.

Weill instituted a joint program with the New York City Board of Education in 1980 that created the Academy of Finance, which trains high school students for careers in financial services. He serves as Chairman of the National Academy Foundation, which oversees more than 640 academies that operate in 41 states and the District of Columbia, and is the principal sponsor of New York City's High School of Economics and Finance.

He also is chairman of the Board of Overseers for The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College and Graduate School of Medical Sciences of Cornell University, having joined the board in 1982 and becoming chair in 1996. (Cornell named the medical college after the Weills in April 1998 in recognition of their support.)

Weill, born March 16, 1933, is a graduate of Cornell University. He and his wife, Joan, have been married for 50 years. They have two adult children and four grandchildren.

To read an excerpt (.pdf file), click here.

To watch Weill's appearance on The Early Show, click here.



Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006

"Spoiled Rotten America: Outrages of Everyday Life"


Larry Miller has been in movies such as "Pretty Woman" and "Best in Show," and a lot of TV shows, but standup comedy is his first love.

The comic has put his act, and a lot of other opinions about his fellow Americans and the world, in a new book called "Spoiled Rotten America: Outrages of Everyday Life."

Miller stopped by The Early Show and chatted about it with co-anchor Harry Smith.

He told Smith the book contains 17 comic essays and, when he was looking for a common theme, he realized it was simply that, "We're all a little spoiled." Miller said Americans of all ages aren't as tough as the generation that came before them, and the book presents a comic's-eye-view of examples.

To see Miller's appearance, click here.

To read an excerpt, click here.



Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2006

"For One More Day"


When a loved one dies, especially a parent, we often think about that one last thing we wanted to tell them.

Mitch Albom's new novel takes that wish and expands it, as the main character imagines spending one full day with his late mother.

The book is called "For One More Day."

Albom discussed it on The Early Show with co-anchor Rene Syler. To see the segment, click here.

To read an excerpt, click here.



Monday, Oct. 2, 2006

"Fat Free: The Amazing All-True Adventures of Supersize Woman!"


Written by Jude Milner and illustrated by Mary Wilshire, this all-true comic book with "gorgeous art" gives "a good demonstration of the problems, shame, and discrimination fat women face" (Publishers Weekly).

"Fat Free: Amazing All-True Adventures of Supersize Woman" is the illustrated story of how Jude Milner tackled taunts of "I don't want her, you can have her, she's too fat for me"; lost over 200 pounds; and replaced self-loathing with self-confidence. "Fat Free" illustrates Milner's journeys through a candy-coated childhood, "Fat is Beautiful" activism, phone sex personas, and gastric bypass surgery. Today, Milner is a psychotherapist and fitness trainer whose mission is to turn fatness into fitness.

To watch Milner's appearance on The Early Show, click here.

To see pages from the book (.pdf files), First excerpt from 'Fat Free' and Second excerpt from 'Fat Free'

For more about Milner's fitness work, click here.



Monday, Oct. 2, 2006

" 'Excuse Me, But I Was Next ...': How to Handle the Top 100 Manners Dilemmas"


Etiquette expert Peggy Post comes to the rescue with a guide to our most vexing etiquette questions. Post addresses these perplexing dilemmas with a direct, personal, down-to-earth style. You'll learn how to politely say "no" to difficult requests, how to introduce someone if you've forgotten their name, how to perform damage control for e-mail bloopers, and much more.

To watch Post's appearance on The Early Show, click here.

To see pages from the book (.pdf files), Questions And Answers From 'Excuse Me' and Table of Contents and Introduction From 'Excuse Me'

For quick tips for handling situations in which others are rude, click here.

To see more about etiquette, go to the Emily Post Institute Web site.



Monday, Oct. 2, 2006

"The Price of Privilege: How Parental Pressure and Material Advantage Are Creating a Generation of Disconnected and Unhappy Kids"


"The book is about the fact that middle- and upper-middle-class kids, privileged kids in this country, are experiencing the highest rates of emotional problems of any socio-economic group in this country," says author Madeline Levine. "The rate of depression among adolescents in this group is three times the rate of depression of kids in the general population. They have substantially higher rates of drug abuse, psychosomatic disorders and cutting, etc. I'm not talking about rich kids; the research has been done on families with incomes of $120,000 to $160,000."

To watch Levine's appearance on The Early Show, click here.

To read an excerpt from "The Price of Privilege," click here.



Monday, Oct. 2, 2006

"Hard Power: The New Politics of National Security"


Michael O'Hanlon, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, co-wrote this book with Kurt Campbell. He appeared on The Early Show to discuss the news of the day, including the Congressional elections and reaction to Bob Woodward's new book.