​A salute to the Queen Mary

They settled in Indiana, and as you might guess, life in the U.S. took some adjustment.

"He was kind of a stranger to me when I first came over here, to be honest about it," Allen said. "We were married 37 years. And like all marriages, it has its ups and downs. We didn't have the happiest marriage in the world. We were kind of opposites in so many ways, 'cause we never got the chance to know each other that well."

Her late husband is now just a memory. So, too, the Golden Age of ocean liners.

By the 1960s, jet aircraft had all but replaced ships for transatlantic travel, and in 1967 -- with great reluctance -- the Queen Mary was taken on her final voyage by Captain John Treasure Jones.

"In the older days the only way of getting around the world was to go by sea," Capt. Jones said at the time. "But now you hop in these damn wind machines and you can go anywhere in no time almost."

The city of Long Beach, Calif., bought the Queen Mary for $3.5 million, and on December 9, 1967, she tied up there for good -- after having crossed the Atlantic 1,001 times.

Today, the Queen Mary is a floating hotel and museum.

But, for a ship that hasn't sailed in nearly 50 years, she still has the power to move.

When asked what the ship means to her, June Allen replied, "It's like me, it's gotten old. But the ship is beautiful. I'm getting old, but the ship is still beautiful!"

And to others who sailed on her (or wish they had), the Queen Mary is not so much a ship as a shrine.

"The Queen Mary, being like any small town or city -- children were born on board, and people have passed away, especially during the ravages of the Second World War," said historian Everette Hoard. "It's truly hallowed ground, she is."


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